© 2018 Monica Lynn Manoski photos courtesy Ashley L. Wood, Suje Garcia, Linda Pagani, Samara Pearlstein

LOVE be the change

Boston, November 2016 - present

political yard signs

 

These signs were made post-election to empower people to be the change they want to see. To date, they've been placed on lawns and in homes and schools in IN, IL, MA, TX, FL, and CA. In January of 2017, the signs were distributed at the Women's March in Boston.

hashtag

lunchbag

Boston, September 29, 2016

hunger action event

In response to Hunger Action Month, I organized a lunch-packing event to provide meals for the homeless. Students, faculty, and staff at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts came together to assemble sandwiches, write inspirational notes, and pack lunches. The meals were distributed at local shelters and other designated places of need.

TOGETHER WE CAN CREATE A SAFE SPACE FOR OUR KIDS TO LEARN, PLAY & GROW

Chicago, July 1, 2016

peace walk

The July 4th holiday is a notorious time in Chicago. It is often the most violent weekend of the year. On Friday, July 1, 2016, I led my school on a peace walk around the community. We walked silently, holding hands, and wearing peace sign shirts. Our silence and unity, through hand holding, served as a symbolic statement of our school and community’s hope for peace.

peaches don't come from cans

Chicago, 2015 - 2016

community garden

In the fall of 2015, I studied trees with my students. I asked them, “What foods come from trees?” When no one volunteered an answer, I pressed further. “Where do peaches come from?” A few hands shot into the air. I called on one student; her response was, “Cans!” The student was "right." Almost all the fruits and vegetables served at school arrived on a weekly basis in large, cylindrical cans. Determined to show students where real food comes from, the idea for the community garden was born.

17 REASONS TO STOP SHOOTING

Chicago, April 2015

paper, xeroxed photos, punch-out letters

 

At 9:50 in the morning, while my students and I were outside at recess, a shooting took place on the other side of our school’s wrought iron fence. The sounds of children laughing and playing did not deter the men from violence. The blatant disregard for the safety of my students was alarming. I responded to the incident by making a large sign that depicted my 17 students. Above their pictures in bold red font was written: 17 REASONS TO STOP SHOOTING. The banner was displayed outside for the community to see.